Wednesday, January 18, 2006

"Tonight on Fox: Celebrity Bomb Squad!"

Is it me, or is this "_________ with the Stars" format just getting sillier and sillier? First it was Dancing with the Stars. Now it's Skating with Celebrities. What's next?

By the way, I wonder if any of you happened to catch American Idol's season premiere last night. If you did, there was this wonderful moment where the irascible Simon Cowell said something to the effect of, "the worst thing you can do is give someone false hope..." He said this apropos of a "singer" who clearly did not have, and never would have, what it takes. All I can say is, Bravo, old chap! Maybe we don't have to throw cold water on people with quite as much malicious glee as Simon does--but as that psychiatrist told me when I was researching SHAM, "There are an awful lot of kids today who really need for someone to take away their dreams..."

Another significant moment from last night's show found Ryan Seacrest interviewing a contestant as she went on and on about how "confident" she was, and how she just knew that her "confidence" was going to carry the day with the judges. Uh, not quite. You know why? Because she couldn't sing. Which reminds us, for the how-many-umpteenth time, that (a) sheer confidence, in the absence of skill, ain't gonna cut it, and (b) in a right-thinking world, it's the skill that comes first. Then comes the confidence.

1 comment:

Rodger Johnson said...

My wife and I watched American Idol. Simon is right, “the worst thing you can do is give someone false hope....” How unfortunate it must be for some to live with such ballooned self-esteem.

Even when Cowell – or any professional for that matter – is honest, that criticism just doesn’t sink into people with grandiose self-esteem. I see this every day when I teach a remedial class at a community college. Many are deaf to criticism.

It’s interesting the psychologist interviewed for SHAM said that, "There are an awful lot of kids today who really need for someone to take away their dreams..." Sounds harsh, but when we look at our grandparents who lived through the Depression and World War II, we see a people who lost their dreams, but that made them stronger, developed character, and created a generation of “real” achievers and believers.

Anymore, we meet wishy-washy, obnoxious and overly confident people everywhere. Sad, isn’t it?