Monday, February 20, 2006

And, on an unrelated note...

I've got the lead opinion piece in today's (February 21) edition of the Los Angeles Times. Faithful readers will recall that in January, the Times ran my opinion piece, "Self-Help's Big Lie," which ignited a second round of media interest in SHAM.

If you're willing to make the investment in reading it, I'd be eager to hear any responses you may have. The piece covers themes that I'd very much like to develop into a new book on journalism and modern media.

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

Well, it's an encouraging sign that a major newspaper featured a piece attacking news media, isn't it? I'm concerned that a book on the topic would meet the same fate as SHAM in terms of media exposure--the media's too invested in its bad-news machine to want to shine a light on it--but reader response should be phenomenal. This reader would buy it in a heartbeat!

Cal said...

Steve,

First of all I thought your article in the LA Times was right on. Every morning when I open up the newspaper and every evening when I turn on the news I am, like all the other readers and viewers, introduced to a lead story about death, violence, failure, fire, corruption and every other variation of a depressing story that comes across media's desk.

As it pertains to your previous blogs about the Olympics and sportshink you know I have to throw in my two cents on this one. As you know I do believe that when competing the mindset of believing you will do well does have an effect on whether or not you will. Bode Miller believed he was going to do well, but you can't win all the time and when he is done racing he says the same thing everytime and that is that he did his best on that given day. In the case of Ted Ligety I imagine that yes, he did not expect to win gold, but he did think and believe that he was going to be successful. Heck he is representing the United States in the Olympic Games where on any given day one of these guys could beat anybody. "Do you believe in Miracles?" Remember the 1980 men's hockey team? Back to Ligety though. If he believed that he would not do his best his name would have been mentioned once during these Olympics and that would be when he was in the starting gate. We also can't forget that the athletes we are discussing are obsessive compulsive individuals with the mindset that they can beat somebody in anything whether it's downhill skiing or bridge. If somebody interviewed them after any event I am willing to bet that they would all say something to the effect of, "I gave it my best with the mindset that I was going to win and it just wasn't my day today." They always believe that they are going to win. And you know what, it's good to think that, as long as we have the fortitude to get back up when things don’t work out without of course a book by Dr. Phil or Oprah or Big Tony.

Steve Salerno said...

So if I sold it as an ebook via my web site or my blog, instead of through the usual channels....? :) Alas, that only works, in general, for people like Stephen King, who've already made their killing in publishing and have a core following of millions of devoted readers... We'll see what works out. Thanks, "Anon," for the feedback.

Anonymous said...

Actually, I think a major house would bring the book out, since they'd recognize the dollar potential with the general public. But you might have to promote it via your blog and website, since getting you media time might be another matter!

Steve Salerno said...

Yep. Even Bernie Goldberg--who'd worked for decades at CBS and whose book, Bias, sold like a gazillion copies and launched an entire trend in right-wing media-bashing--had a very, very tough time getting booked on national media.

Anonymous said...

Interesting article in Times. I never really thought of it that way. Its true its all bad news all the time but I never really thought about that being the opposite of life, not life itself. It kind of changes things.--Rick

Anonymous said...

Steve. I think I may have found a SHAM site that even you may like. Paul's Tips has some pretty interesting views.

Anonymous said...

I agree with Cal. Steve, I think you're making too much of this "if they really believed in themselves they would've finished first" stuff. That's a little unfair to what motivational training says. A motivated athlete will do better than an unmotivated one. I have no doubt that these athletes would tell you that the mental side of their game is what distinguishes them from other run of the mill athletes, and has taken them as far as the Olympics.

Spinstergrrl said...

Your article brings up some good points. One common expression used by those in the news media that you forgot to mention in is "If it bleeds, it leads." The worse an event is, the more likely it will be the lead story for that night. But hey, people may moan and complain that all the news ever seems to show is 'the bad stuff' but almost all of us slow down to gawk at a terrible auto accident on the side of the road! -Jodi