Sunday, June 03, 2012

If a journalist journals in the forest...

I'm going to have some thoughts on journalism and related matters in the coming daysactually, I have some thoughts as we speak, but they haven't quite jelled into publishable form. I thought I might present this "review post" so that anyone who's interested can acquaint himself/herself with my ruminations to date, for what they're worth

Here's "Journalist Bites Reality!", a (too) long piece I did for Skeptic on (what I adjudge to be) the sad state of modern journalism. And here's "Caution: Objective Journalist at Work," a piece for National Review on the agenda that tends to creep into so much of what's presented to us as honest journalism. And finally, something for The Los Angeles Times on the core paradox of the news biz, in my view: "Good News is No News."

Get caught up if you're of such a mind, and we'll talk again soon.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Reading your last linked article--the Dow story is an unfortunate example to choose given the very emotive and still much contested subject of Bhopal.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhopal_disaster

Interesting that 30 years on Dow has been employing the private intelligence outfit Stratfor to spy on Bhopal activists. Now that should be news, and not good news either.

Dow have also sponsored the skin of the Olympic Stadium in London and get exclusive bragging and advertising rights for their cash--cash that the Olympic organisers fell over themselves to accept-- which many feel is an insult given the very poor response to the Bhopal victims and the ongoing health problems of their descendants.

Fit and Fibrous said...

Very interesting, I especially liked the long, thoughtful piece in Skeptic magazine. It's no wonder that some people make very strange decisions if their information is so badly skewed.

Adrian said...

Very interesting, I especially liked the long, thoughtful piece in Skeptic magazine. It's no wonder that some people make very strange decisions if their information is so badly skewed.

Anonymous said...

This is really some very interesting stuff that I've never even thought about before, Steve. Very true thought that the media simultaneously tries to sell a story as sensational and par for the course. It can't be both!

Anonymous said...

This is interesting, about the increasing privatisation and corporatisation of the current covert global war efforts:

http://www.tomdispatch.com/blog/175547/tomgram%3A_andrew_bacevich%2C_the_golden_age_of_special_operations/

It answers your point (admittedly made some years ago) about the vast majority of military personnel NOT getting killed while serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. There is a further piece that covers the increasing use of drone warfare--which ensures that those getting killed are nameless and uncounted brownskinned citizens going about their daily lives in an undeclared war zone:

http://www.tomdispatch.com/blog/175548/tomgram%3A_nick_turse%2C_hot_drone-on-drone_action/

Freedom, Democracy, Progress, Keeping the Global Peace---don't ya just love it!

Anonymous said...

My last submission to the conundrum of what constitutes
'truthful news' these days, as I am sure that my 'non-self help' comments are increasingly depressing and annoying.


Here is some Dutch guy (ex-military) doing some self-help in the pursuit of truthful news, “[My] main goal to listen to this communication is to listen to ‘the truth,’ without any military or political propaganda.”:


http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2011/03/secret-libya-psyops/


and a brilliant blog from an ex-State employee (fired for writing a blog, specifically for posting a link to Wikileaks on his blog):

http://wemeantwell.com/blog/

Jenny said...

What a great topic, Steve. It seems to me people want and need to hear important news, relevant information that enhances our lives, and (especially) wakes us from our collective "57 channels and nothin' on" mentality. (Remember that Bruce Springsteen song?)

Okay, maybe I can't speak for everyone here, but I for one am bored silly by mainstream anything (almost) and look forward to your next installment on journalism... and related matters. :)